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The Pet Professional Guild provides for its members lots of educational opportunities. Each month we offer our members one FREE 
webinar and as we expand we will grow our member webinar services.  The Guild also offer a selection of education courses 
through third party providers. If you would like to host a webinar with PPGBI then please complete this short form 


Upcoming events

    • Thursday, February 20, 2020
    • 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, KPA 1

    “Learning is a relatively permanent change in behaviour potentiality that occurs as a result of reinforced practice” – G.A. Kimble

    All animals, human and non-human, learn in a number of different ways – through trial and error, insight, socially or by association, nonetheless, dog trainers typically train with only one approach. Conventional training relies on instrumental and associative learning to accomplish its goals; trainers work with classical and operant conditioning to utilise rewards or punishment to reinforce or dissuade behaviours. How conditioning is applied however, varies greatly in method and technique. Positive trainers encounter a veritable schism of to click or not to click, how to treat, when to treat, how often, to be silent or to be verbal, to use emotion or be neutral, to use one word or two, where to put a name if at all, to use body language or be still, to use eye contact or not and so on. All of which can be a not so positive divide in the world of positive dog training.

    Our individual approaches to dog training are highly influenced by what everyone else is doing or cultural norms, personal intuition and experience. And while that may be why we train the way we do, what does science have to say about the how to best train a dog question?

    Focusing on the most effective and humane ways to train dogs without force, this webinar takes a look at some of the latest research on the use of social learning as training methodology, and offers insights into the comparisons of the effectiveness of verbal markers, acoustic markers or none when paired with positive reinforcement.

    Learning Objectives

    • Take a closer look at how learning theory posits a number of different ways all animals learn. How well suited are these to how we train dogs?
    • Review the latest research on social learning for dog training.
    • Know what the studies find as the most effective cues, markers and reinforcers in associative learning techniques used in training.
    •  Answer the “to click or not to click” question

    About The Presenter


    Frania Shelley-Grielen is a professional animal behaviourist, dog trainer and educator who holds a Masters Degrees in Animal Behaviour from Hunter College and a Masters Degree in Urban Planning from New York University, Complimenting her insight into behaviour with an in-depth understanding of the built environment. She is a licensed Pet Care Technician Instructor, a registered therapy dog handler, a certified Doggone Safe Bite Safety Instructor, and a professional member of the Pet Professional Guild and the Association of Pet Dog Trainers. Frania specialises in behaviour modification work and training with cats, dogs and birds and humane management for urban wildlife.

    Frania is the author of Cats and Dogs; Living with and Looking at Companion Animals from their Point of View. She founded AnimalBehaviorist.us in 2009, to share her work on how welfare based, science focused strategies and solutions from the canine and feline point of view are more effective and make everyone happier, including the humans. Frania also taught the ASPCA’s Fundamentals of Dog Care course for the Houlton Institute where she is on the zoology faculty. She has worked on research projects at the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History and the ASPCA in NYC. Frania presents and consults in the metropolitan New York area, nationally and internationally. She lives in New York City with her family and cats and dogs.

    • Tuesday, February 25, 2020
    • 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1.5



    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


    Re-think Trigger Stacking - Shedding some (candle) light on triggers for behaviours we wish to modify or change


    TTouch Instructor Edie-Jane Eaton has shared her ‘candle’ concept for many years.  We may all be aware of the term ‘trigger stacking’ but Edie-Jane’s brilliant analogy helps canine guardians look more closely at the multiple ‘candles’ that may be burning for a dog that is struggling to learn or cope with his environment and human led activities.

    Several candles may be alight due to internal problems such as pain, patterns of tension through the body, the environment at home including slippery floors, noise sensitivity, the games that are played and the way a dog is touched long before more candles are lit once out in the big wide world. 

    Whilst it may not be possible to blow out every candle, there is a lot that we can do to help our clients snuff out the flames, reducing ‘ heat’ and enabling a dog to settle and learn. 

    This webinar presentation will also include the following learning objectives

    1. The link between posture and behaviour
    2. Introduction to ACE Free Work
    3. Simple leash handling techniques to reduce body tension



    About The Presenter


    Sarah Fisher

    Tilley Farm, Farmborough,


    Sarah Fisher is a canine and equine behaviour advisor. She has worked with animals for over twenty years and incorporates some of the elements of the Tellington TTouch method in her work. She is experienced with a wide range of breed types and teaches staff workshops for many of the UK’s animal welfare organisations including Battersea. She has also worked in Europe teaching staff workshops for shelters including SPCA Malta and GIA (Romania) and has taught workshops and clinics for dog trainers and behaviourists in Holland, Greece, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, South Africa, Ireland, Romania and Poland.

    Sarah gives presentations on a variety of topics at dog training and behaviour seminars in the UK and abroad, and is a regular speaker at the annual Dog Behaviour Conference. She also conducts behaviour assessments for private clients, animal welfare organisations and court cases.

    Sarah is a published author and has participated in numerous television and radio programmes over the years including the recent Nightmare Pets SOS for BBC1. She runs courses under the name Animal Centred Education (ACE) for trainers, groomers, veterinary nurses, physiotherapists and animal behaviour counsellors who wish to broaden their expertise by learning detailed observations combined with Free Work, and techniques inspired by other professionals working in the world of animal welfare and behaviour.

     

    • Monday, March 16, 2020
    • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


    The vast majority of existing dog training strategies which relate to canine fear and anxiety are designed to help ‘fearful’ dogs, but all dogs encounter a crisis of confidence at some point in their lives or face situations that test their resilience. How a dog copes with these life challenges and how their families interact with them, will determine everyone’s future success.

    Victoria Stilwell will introduce BRAVE - a set of new essential dog training protocols which can be specifically adapted for all dogs regardless of their level of anxiety or fear.  (This will be an introduction only webinar with some examples, as BRAVE protocols are extensive. They will be available and accessed in future online courses designed for all dog lovers.)

    Learning Objectives:

    • How a dog can be helped to face life challenges
    • Some tips on how families should interact with a nervous dog
    • An introduction to BRAVE dog training protocols 
    • Some examples of BRAVE dog training protocols and how and when they should be implemented

    About The Presenter


    Victoria Stilwell


    Victoria Stilwell is a world-renowned dog trainer best known as the star of the international hit TV series It's Me or the Dog as well as Greatest American Dog on CBS, Dogs Might Fly on Sky TV, Dogs with Extraordinary Jobs for the Smithsonian Channel, Help My Dog is Out of Control for the BBC, and various featured web series including Guardians of the Night. Having filmed over 110 episodes of It’s Me or the Dog since 2005, Stilwell is able to reach audiences in over 120 countries with her philosophy of positive training methods.  A best-selling author of 5 books including her latest book, The Ultimate Guide to Raising A Puppy, Stilwell appears frequently in the media and is widely recognised as a leader in the field of animal behaviour.    

    A passionate advocate for positive dog training methods, Stilwell is the Editor-in-Chief of Positively.com, the founder of the Victoria Stilwell Academy for Dog Training & Behavior, and the CEO of Victoria Stilwell Positively Dog Training – the world’s premier global network of positive dog trainers.

    The recipient of multiple awards, Stilwell is committed to helping the cause of animal rescue and rehabilitation and is heavily involved with organisations around the world to increase awareness of puppy mills, dogfighting, animal abuse, pet overpopulation, dog bite prevention and other animal-related causes, but she is best known as a champion for fear-free positive reinforcement dog training methods.  She is an Ambassador for the RSPCA, International Ambassador for the Soi Dog Foundation and serves on the Advisory Boards of RedRover, The Georgia Pet Coalition, The Grey Muzzle Foundation, DogTV, Dognition, W-Underdogs and Canine Assistants.



    • Friday, March 20, 2020
    • 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


    Essential Training Lessons learned from 8 Years of Living with a frantic dog, and what you can do to bring zen into your life.

    Learning Objectives

      • “Gentle Punishment” and why it leads to chaos.
      • The importance of predictability and control.
      • Creating skills, why variable is usually (but not always) bad.
      • You cannot reinforce calm. It’s not a behaviour. You can however create calm.
      • Splitting matters.
      • Bad behaviour chains and the case against redirecting away from “bad” behaviour.
      • Extinction of behaviours on maintained by continuous reinforcement and variable. How the response differs - and recognising that extinction, on its own can be very frantic.
      • Build duration. The passage of time can be a cue.
      • Associations. Your dog is usually right. Door bells do mean people are at the door. Bowls tend to mean food. Hands reaching means cookies are coming. They ARE exciting.
      • How to decrease the arousal that comes from associations. Think cats and can openers.
      • Higher order conditioning. Why do dogs get so excited in the car? What you can do about it.
      • Bad behaviour chains can create frantic looking behaviour
      • Bodily functions
      • Social pressure is the death of good training
      • Saboteurs are even worse.
      • What to do when you mess up.
      • While it’s a hard sell, “50 tiny steps to success” is a faster, less stressful route than “3 easy steps.” The case against falling for popular online marketing.



      About The Presenter


      Yvette Van Veen


      Yvette Van Veen has two decades of experience training dogs, lives and works in London Ontario. She offers both group and private sessions. She has worked extensively with formerly feral dogs. Yvette’s writing has been a long-standing feature in Ontario’s newspapers, currently appearing in the Toronto Star.  Her life is shared with her son Jordan, her formerly feral dog, “Kipper the ex-crotch ripper”, border collie, “Karma” and Icarus the cat. You can reach Yvette at info@awesomedogs.ca or follow her at:  https://www.facebook.com/londondogtrainer/


      • Tuesday, March 24, 2020
      • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)

      It’s hard to get a good grasp on the big picture of behavior problems when we are working with a small proportion of the population. This interactive webinar takes an in-depth look at behavior problems in dogs. Populations change over time – we'll cover the most up-to-date information we have on this topic!

      We will cover a lot of ground in this talk. Including: Which behavior issues are most prevalent? What role does the dog’s sex, spay/neuter status, age, and origin play? What factors might be driving behavior issues in dogs? Which behavior issues tend to co-occur?

      Use this information to serve your client’s better by focusing on what’s most important for them and their dogs. These research findings will allow you to design training and behavior programs that are proactive about prevention and early intervention and as effective as possible!

      Learning Objectives:

      • List the most recent information we have on the demographics of behavior problems in dogs (for example, what impact does spay/neuter have on the prevalence of behavior issues?)
      • Identify which behavior problems tend to co-occur
      • Explain which behavior issues are most prevalent
      • Apply this information to prevention, early intervention and modification of behavior issues in dogs


      About The Presenter


      Dr. Kristina Spaulding


      Dr. Spaulding has a PhD in biopsychology - the study of the biological basis of behavior - and is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist through the Animal Behavior Society. She specializes in stress and behavior, social cognition and emotion, positive welfare and the prevention and treatment of behavior problems in dogs. In addition to her academic background, she has been in the dog training and behavior profession for 19 years. She currently splits her time between private behavior work and teaching other dog trainers and behavior consultants online and through seminars and conferences.

      In addition, Dr. Spaulding is a long-standing member of the APDT Education Committee. She is also a member of the Fear Free Advisory Group and an authorized Speaker for Fear Free. She also chairs a task force for Meeting of the Minds, a coalition of top dog professionals across the country charged with improving the quality of life for our dogs and is a member of the IAABC Foundation Board. You can find out more about her on her website. (http://smartdogtrainingandbehavior.com/online-services/)

      • Thursday, April 02, 2020
      • 2:00 PM
      • Friday, April 03, 2020
      • 11:00 PM
      • Virtual, Listen Live, Listen To The Recordings or Do Both!
      Register

       Help Celebrate the Launch of PPG’s Pet Rescue

      Resource With Us!

      PPGBI & PPG ARE CO-HOSTING A SPECIAL TWO-DAY

      VIRTUAL SUMMIT ON THURSDAY, APRIL 2 & FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2020

      Register for the Virtual Summit and Participate Live or Listen to the Recordings Later. Even better You Can Do Both. Your Choice! 

      Approved CEUs PPAB 16, CCPDT,  IAABC & KPA pending

      Soon to be hosted on it's very own website!

      What is the Pet Rescue Resource?

      The Pet Rescue Resource’s primary aim is to help improve the prospects of pets in a shelter or rescue environment by shortening the length of stay for each pet while increasing adoption and retention rates. As a secondary mission, it will also help and support adopters, foster home networks, and professional pet trainers and care providers. Recognising that many hard working volunteers and others who support pet rescue on a daily basis may have minimal experience in animal training, the Pet Rescue Resource Toolkit has been designed specifically so it can be implemented by a cross section of pet professionals, volunteers, pet parents and pet hobbyists. This Behavior and Welfare Toolkit will consist of a number of comprehensive programmes comprising a collection of articles, training plans, and videos across a broad range of topics. It will also include modules that focus on topics of a smaller scope. Each of the resources provided in the Toolkit are designed to guide and support programmes for the management, behaviour modification, training, and enrichment of animals in shelters and foster homes. As a PPG developed concept, the Pet Rescue Resource reflects our organisation’s mission to provide the greatest value, highest quality, state-of-the-art, force-free, science-based education on the training, behaviour consulting, and care of companion animals.

      The Summit Focus is Rescue and Shelter Focused, Collaborative Care and Enrichment Creating Partnerships for Positive Results!


      2 Days, each featuring 4 live webinars.  8 exceptional educational experiences!

      Your Virtual Summit Presenters

      1. Dr. Karolina Westlund - Preventing and Reducing Fear in The Shelter Environment
      2. Dr. Nick Thompson - Seven Top Tips to Promote Calm in Rescue and Shelter Dogs
      3. Dr. Morag Heirs - Scent Work Solutions for Dogs in Rescues & Shelters
      4. Malena DeMartini & Casey McGee - Rethinking Separation Anxiety in the Homeless Dog
      5. Dr. Robert Hewings – T.B.D.
      6. Dr. Juliane Kaminski - Code Breaker: How dogs understand us (and we them)
      7. Dr. Zazie Todd - Implementing Science-Based Training in Shelter and Rescue
      8. Dr. Kathy Murphy – What is Arousal and When is Too Little or Too Much Harmful, & What Can We Do to optimize It In Shelter Dogs
      Your  Virtual Summit Schedule

      Thursday, April 2

      Dr. Kathy Murphy 9:00 a.m. – 10.30 a.m. ET

      2:00 - 3:30 p.m. BST

      Dr. Nick Thompson 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. ET

      4:00 - 5:30 p.m. BST

      Malena DeMartini & Casey McGee 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. ET

      7:30 - 9:00 p.m. BST

      Dr. Zazie Todd 4: 30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. ET

      9:30 - 11:00 p.m. BST

      Friday, April 3, 2020

      Dr. Karolina Westlund 9:00 a.m. – 10.30 a.m. ET

      2:00 - 3:30 p.m. BST

      Dr. Morag Heirs 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. ET

      4:00 - 5:30 p.m. BST

      Dr. Robert Hewings 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. ET

      7:30 - 9:00 p.m.  BST

      Dr. Juliane Kaminski. 4: 30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. ET

      9:30 - 11:00 p.m. BST


      To view the presenter session information and their bios please click here. Your webinar link will remain the same for each presentation.


      Please Support The Event Sponsors! 

       

       

       

       


      • Friday, April 03, 2020
      • 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)

      Welcome to the age of genetic testing! Suddenly panels of genetic tests for dogs are relatively affordable for the average pet owner. These tests claim to tell you what your dog’s breed ancestry is (for those of us with mystery mixes) and to give you a heads-up about possible health issues. However, although similar direct-to-consumer testing is carefully regulated for humans, there is no regulation in place for them in veterinary medicine. Additionally, while trained genetic counselors are available to help interpret these results for your human family, no such specialty exists among veterinarians, and general practice veterinarians are not typically trained in this area. How much can we trust the results of these tests? Are some tests or companies more reliable than others? Dr. Hekman is a veterinarian and a genomics researcher who studies canine genetics. She will explain how these tests work, and will build on that explanation to explain the differences between various products, and which products are helpful in which situations.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Be able to read canine ancestry results ("what breeds are in your mix?") with an understanding of which results are more or less reliable, and why.
      • Evaluate different genetic testing companies with an understanding of which products are better for your needs.
      • Understand and explain differences between health test results with traditional at risk/carrier/clear status versus those with more complex interpretation.
      • Describe the basics of how genetic testing works.

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



      • Friday, April 24, 2020
      • 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC (pending), KPA 1

      It is likely that social isolation contributes to reduced welfare for dogs living in animal shelters. One type of intervention that addresses this concern, human interaction out of the kennel, has been demonstrated to improve behavior and reduce physiological measures of stress for shelter-living dogs.

      In this presentation, I will discuss research from the Canine Science Collaboratory & the Applied Animal Welfare & Behavior Lab that was conducted across the United States in which we’ve investigated the impact of two-nights away (sleepovers) from the shelter; and more recently, two-hour outings (field trips) on dogs’ stress, rest, and activity levels. We’ll examine their particular effects to better understand how these programs are impacting the lives of dogs awaiting adoption in animal shelters.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Gain a better understanding of the impact of human interaction on the welfare of dogs living in animal shelters
      • Reference the different physiological and activity measures used to measure canine welfare

      • Differentiate the effects of these interventions and their overall impact on welfare

      • Utilize this information to develop enrichment strategies for dogs in your shelter

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Lisa Gunter

      Lisa Gunter, PhD, CBCC-KA is the Maddie's Fund Research Fellow at Arizona State University in the Department of Psychology and conducts her research in the Canine Science Collaboratory. She currently leads the Maddie’s Fund Nationwide Fostering Study. Before beginning her graduate studies, she worked for nearly a decade with dogs in animal shelters and with pet dogs and their owners. The goal of Lisa's research is to better the lives of dogs. To this aim, she has investigated the breed labeling of shelter dogs, their breed heritage, housing and dog-to-dog interaction in the shelter, temporary fostering and short-term outings, behavioral indicators of welfare, and post-adoption interventions focused on owner retention. Under the mentorship of Clive Wynne, Lisa earned her Masters in 2015, and her PhD in 2018 as a graduate student in the behavioral neuroscience program at Arizona State University. She has published her research in scientific journals, presented her findings at numerous conferences, and received national and international media attention for her work.


      • Wednesday, May 13, 2020
      • 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)

      This webinar will focus on the dogs who develop aggressive behaviours toward their owners. We will talk a little about what aggressive behaviours are, and how they are perceived by the owners, how they influence the dynamic and relationships in the house, how to address it, manage it and help a dog develop new behaviours.

      Learning Objectives

      • What does aggressive behaviour look like?
      • Why do dogs use aggressive behaviour?
      • Safety in dealing with dogs who show aggressive behaviours
      • Strategies to change aggressive behaviours
      • Defensive aggressive behaviour, what does it mean?
      • How to change the owners and thus change the behaviour?
      • Is it management or is it behaviour modification techniques?
      • Expectations about other species behaviours and what we want from dogs


      About The Presenter


      Claudia Estanislau


      Claudia is a Certified Dog Trainer and Behavior Consultant. She is currently the manager of It's All About Dogs training center in Portugal operating from four locations. Claudia has been a lecturer at several seminars in Portugal and Brazil on learning theory, aggression and force free training. Paula is also a writer for a national dog magazine in Portugal and writes on dog behavior and training.

      Claudia’s formal qualifications are DTBC from the CASI Institute. Claudia completed the LLA course with Dr. Susan Friedman and Claudia is an Associate Certified member at IAABC and a PPG Member.



      • Friday, June 05, 2020
      • 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)

      So you have a shy dog - one who's easily frightened of strange people or places, or maybe even one who sits at home IMAGINING what horrible thing might happen next. Is this because of genetics? Or did you mess up somehow? In this webinar, Jessica will talk about the biology behind anxiety: the roles of genetics, early environment (as early as in mum's uterus!), and socialisation.

      Spoiler alert: you didn't mess up. But this webinar will help you understand better where your dog is coming from and help you think through the many different puzzle pieces that made her who she is. Jessica will also provide concrete suggestions for breeders, puppy buyers, and working dog trainers to help minimise the chances of producing or buying anxious dogs.

      Learning Objectives:

      • List the different methods by which parents pass information on to their offspring, which might make offspring more or less anxious

      • Discuss the importance of mild stress, but not trauma, in early life

      • Explain how genetics and early life experiences can interact to result in adult anxiety

      • Describe the pre-fear period in puppies and explain its relevance to adult anxiety

      • List some negative effects of stress in terms of health and well-being

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



      • Friday, August 07, 2020
      • 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


      Veterinarians used to routinely recommend that your dog be neutered (spayed or castrated) at 6 months of age.  That recommendation has been questioned in the past decade as information about the possible health consequences of early age neuter (or neuter at any age) comes to light.

      Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will discuss what we know about the relationship of spay/neuter timing and changes in the risk of development of cancer and/or of orthopedic injuries such as cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCL tear).  She will also talk about how spay/neuter can affect behaviour, for better or worse.  She will specifically discuss some recent studies and will detail problems designing effective studies to ask these questions. She will also cover alternative approaches to the traditional spay/neuter surgery. If you are wondering when, or if, you should neuter your dog, make your decision based on facts, not emotions.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Interpret recent findings about spay/neuter outcomes in light of what those studies can actually tell us
      • Make reasoned decisions about the risk of cancer/orthopedic disease and early spay/neuter
      • List alternatives to traditional spay/neuter and compare their pros and cons to traditional spay/neuter
      • RELAX about this decision!

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



      • Friday, October 02, 2020
      • 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
      • Live Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)

      Anxiety is a major problem for many pet dogs. What happens in your dog's brain and body when something scares her? How long can you expect her stress response to last?

      In this webinar, Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will talk about the stress response in dogs. She will explain the original evolutionary purpose of the stress response; what the hormones involved in it (like cortisol) do in the body; the difference between acute and chronic stress and the different effects they have on dogs' health; and what we know about how long it takes the body to clear those hormones. You will definitely learn some cool stuff about how the brain works and what that means for your stressed-out dog!

      Learning Objectives:

      • Describe how the stress response functions and what its purpose is.
      • Describe health effects (both positive and negative!) for acute versus chronic stress.
      • Explain how the stress response affects the dog's brain and their ability to think clearly and behave normally.
      • Describe how long it takes the stress response to clear from the body, and list possible alternative explanations for dogs who display signs of stress longer than it takes for stress hormones to be cleared.

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.





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